Monthly Archives: November 2014

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Getting out

November 2, 2014
raepizer
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Time has moved on and things are getting easier – in fact there are some real positives. Bella and I have been out and met with other English-speaking mums with babies, although none of them as old as Bella. The house is looking more like a home and Bella seems more relaxed. We have solved the morning fight by simply not having breakfast until we are washed and dressed. The lure of food seems to help. The good weather seems to help too – it’s so beautiful here, walking along the Isar or in the forest in the Autumn sun. Apparently its usually much colder here now and last year they even had snow but this year its mainly beautiful golden Autumn days with glorious blue skies, punctuated by some really rainy days which means we can mix up staying in and going out. When asked Bella says she likes it here – the garden is more accessible and we do lots together. We made paper pumpkins this week for Halloween and did some painting, playdoh, singing and generally playing. We visited the neighbour together, explored the shopping area and at weekend we all went to the Zoo – one of my faourite places already. However, there are times where Bella says she misses yellow door or she misses her friends or her grandma and then I feel sad. We printed out some photos of her friends for her bedroom and one night she turned her face blue sleeping on a photo of her and Georgie (a nursery friend we left behind).

First days in Germany

November 2, 2014
raepizer
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The first week was tough – I’m not going to lie to you. My husband was at work and I was left to unpack boxes while looking after my 2 year old daughter. We had no internet or phone line and I had no mobile phone – so basically no access to the outside world and no way to find out what groups there might be to take my daughter to, or to meet other mums. I knew not a word of German and although everybody told me “Everyone in Munich speaks English”, I was not finding this to be the case at all – they might in workplaces but not in the everyday life of most people in Munich.

The first few days I thought it best to stay at the house trying to bring some normality back to mine and Bella’s life, unpacking our lives into the shapes that we recognize and call home. Bella was bored and wanted to play mostly, so the next day we went for a walk into the forest and visited the local playground although that was a bit wet. We had some fun taking pictures of each other in the woods then walked back home. The next few days were very wet and so we stayed in. Playing with a (bossy) 2 year old was beginning to drain me – having to play shop over and over, sit in a circle with the dollies, or sing the same song time after time again. I had no adult conversation at all. I had no life.

This was meant to be my dream time, my time with Bella, our time together, bonding, enjoying quality time. Morning was a struggle – there was the daily fight over Bella not wanting a wash and me wanting to get the wash over with. This usually followed some row over the colour of Bella’s milk bottle (we were buying it from different places). Then during the day while I tried to unpack boxes Bella would be trying to drag me to her toys. While I tried to hoover, Bella would insist on doing it all by herself which meant it didn’t get done at all. I was getting frustrated and Bella was trying her best to help. I was getting more frustrated. We needed to get out. We did go to the zoo and spent a lovely day looking at all the animals and visiting the playground – Bella (almost) didn’t cry at all – just one crazy screaming event on the way out about going through the turnstiles. In the evenings Bella didn’t want to go to bed – she constantly wanted to be near me and I constantly craved time to myself. I felt like a nobody, with no room for my own life, thoughts, hobbies or work. Steve seemed to be settling into Germany well.

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